Bunny Abandonware

Welcome! We scour old closets, mouldy floppy discs, and the darkest tubes of the internet for the best of the best games in the galaxy, and we exhibit them here, so you can get them down into your hot little hard drives, for you to experience and enjoy some genuine gaming history!

10 January 2007

Dyna Blaster

 in 1992,Arcade,Puzzle — Marrsy

Dyna Blaster Dyna Blaster

A very addictive action/puzzle hybrid with a low learning curve and tons of playability. The plot is not important (kill the big baddie, rescue the girl), just fight your way through a series of mazes, dropping timed bombs to clear out all the monsters. As you progress through the game you will get powerups which will at the very least make your bombs more powerful.

The single player game is good, the multiplayer game is great. Compete against friends trying to blow eachother up (tricking them into walking into an explosion is always the most fun ;)).

All in all a very simple, but very addictive way to waste a few hours πŸ™‚

Related Links

Dyna Blaster

  • Designed by: Hudsonsoft

Download Now »

Size: 419kb (2 min on 56k dial-up)

Resources

Elite

 in 1987,Role Playing (RPG) — Marrsy

Elite Elite Elite

Command your Cobra space ship in a fantastic voyage of discovery and adventure, a supreme test of your combat, navigational and entrepreneurial skills.

Trade between countless planets, using the proceeds to equip your ship with heat-seeking missiles, beam lasers and other weapons – corporate states can be approached without risk, but unruly anarchies may be swarming with space pirates.

Black market trading can be lucrative but could result in skirmishes with local police and a price on your head!

However you make your money, by fair means or foul, you must blast onwards through space annihilating pirate ships and hostile aliens as you strive to earn your reputation as one of the Elite!

The following statement is by no means an exageration, or solely my opinion:

Elite is quite possibly the best game ever created, a masterpiece of design and gameplay.

While the game is immense (remember that word!) the concept is simple: you are a freelance space pilot… that’s it! The game has 8 galaxies to explore, each containing approximately 500 unique planets. You can be a choose to be a trader and ferry goods between worlds, or a pirate who attacks ships and takes their cargo. Or a bounty hunter, or an asteroid miner or… you get the idea πŸ˜‰ Earn money, upgrade your ship, undertake missions, maybe even go after the evil Thargoids (the big bad aliens in the game). What you do is entirely up to you.

Elite Elite

Emulation fans may want to try out the original BBC Micro version of the game, or the Archimedes version – regarded by many (myself included) as the best version. Or if you’d rather stick to the PC version then get a copy of Elite +, the remake that has updated graphics and sound.

This game truly is a classic, two thumbs and a leg up!

Elite Elite Elite

Related Links

  • MobyGames: Elite
    Read all about it on MobyGames.
  • Wikipedia: Elite
    Read all about it on Wikipedia.
  • Ian Bell's Elite Pages
    Ian Bell (along with David Braben) are responsible for the original elite. From his page you can get downloads of every official version ever made along with tons of information.
  • Frontier Developments
    David Braben's development company. Here you can find inormation on Elite and it's sequels (Frontier and First Encounters) as well as the upcoming Elite IV. You'll also find he's done other games you will know and love (psssst Rollercoaster Tycoon).
  • The Elite Club
    The Elite Club is a project which aims to bring new life to the Elite series of games, particularly Frontier and First Encounters - in advance of the release of Elite 4. Despite it being many years since their release, there is still a great deal of interest in them, confirmed by the number of mails we at Frontier Developments received following the original Elite Club announcement. The idea is to allow people to freely download the games as shareware, and also allow people to access the source code and legitimately update the games - bringing them up to date with current technology. We also hope that the creators of some of the Elite/Frontier tribute games will join the Club, as this will provide a support network for developers, and also allow these games to be set in the Elite universe.
  • Elite - The New Kind
    Reverse engineered version of the BBC game, rewritten in C with better graphics for the PC.
  • Jades.org
    Great Elite related site

Elite

  • Designed by: Realtime Games
  • Published by: Firebird

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Size: 49kb (1 mins on 56k dial-up)

Resources

Feud

 in 1987,Action — Marrsy

Feud Feud Feud

No one knows ‘ow long they have been ‘ere; even old Albert don’t recall ’em comin’an”e reckons ‘e might he over ‘undredt. We didn’t mind when they kept themselves to themselves. I mean all we wants is a bit o’piece an’ quiet an’ leave to go about our business. We’re simlple folk ‘ere in Little Dullford and we can’t be don’ with magic an’ spells. I never did ‘old with folk meddlin’ in things best left alone. We’d see ’em o’course; in the forest pickin’ toadstools an’ suchlike, or p’raps one would pop into Tubby Hieke’s shop for ‘erbs an’ stuff, but by an’ large they left us normal folk alone, and that’s ‘ow we like it.

They’d ‘ad arguments before, we all know that. Well, readin’ them magic books all day they can’t be right in the ‘ead can they? Anyway, two summers back, or maybe three (I remember because that was the year Albert’s donkey died), old Leanoric (he’s the older one I think), he turned ‘is brother Learic into a frog! His own brother! but he turned ‘im back after a week an’ at least they didn’t bother us. Two weeks back, all this changed; first the forest went quiet for a few days, not even a sparra’ dared to make a sound. Then the noises began, first shoutin’ then all manner o’ bangs, explosions and things best not thought about. Yesterday, old Leanoric upped an’ left an’ moved to another ‘ut on t’uther side o’village. Hieke (who knows’em better’n most), reckons they’s about to start a feudin’ an’ woe betide the poor soul who gets in their way. That as maybe but there’s strange things afoot in this ‘ere village an’ no mistake. lt don’t take no fancy book learnin’ to figger we ‘ain’t seen the last o’ this, you mark my words.”

In Feud you take on the role of one of two brothers – wizards – who are um.. feuding. You must travel the land collectin ingredients in order to create nasty spells to use against your sibling (who is doing the same). This game was the spectrum equivalent of the one-on-one deatmatch (against the computer) except that this is more fun.*

It’s a very simple concept that works well – though it is not without it’s problems. For instance each game can go on for a very long time, finding ingredients is a lengthy business when the game world is as big as it is in Feud. Also some spells can only be used once, meaning that you have to go to the trouble of collecting the ingredients all over again (very annoying). It would be much better IMO if once you have a spell, you keep it for the duration.

The graphics are very nice for the time the game was released (some of the best seen in the spectrum as far as I know) and the game world itself is quite interesting, if a little on the big side (it’s very easy to get lost).

All in all a fun game, flawed in a few places but still a nice way to waste an hour or so.

* Look, I don’t care what anyone says – Quake sucks arse. Bite me!

Related Links

Feud

  • Designed by: Binary Design Ltd
  • Published by: Bulldog Software

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Size: 106kb (1 mins on 56k dial-up)

Resources

The Final Conflict

 in 1991,Strategy — Marrsy

The Final Conflict The Final Conflict The Final Conflict

I can’t remember exactly where I got this game from, it was probably one of the many hundreds of second hand games that I got from car boot sales and bargain bins. Anyway, for a long time it was just one of those games that I owned but hadn’t gotten around to play untill one night when I was looking for something to play and decided to give it a go – and was hooked for 6 hours or so.

Final conflict is a strategic game of global nuclear war that will appeal to arcade fans more than die-hard wargamers. It comes with a few pre-programmed scenarios : east vs west, the middle east etc or you can choose to conquer the world. A basic game goes like this – use espionage to locate your enemy’s factorys, cities etc and then obliterate them with nuclear ICBMs. Then move in the troops and either obliterate what it left or occupy and use their resources for your advantage. There is also a rather simplistic diplomatic model in which you can convince nations to join your cause. It’s all rather simplistic but as long as you don’t expect anything to deep you should have some fun with it.

It is when enemies launch nuclear weapons against you that the game switches to arcade mode. You have to defend your cities and facilities from incoming warheads using star-wars type weaponry – if you’ve ever played the classic Atari game Missile Command then you’ll be right at home.

For the average gamer this will provide a few hours of enjoyment, die hard strategy gamers will give up out of disgust.

Fun, but nothing special

Related Links

The Final Conflict

  • Designed by: Impressions
  • Published by: Impressions

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Size: 243kb (1 mins on 56k dial-up)

Frederik Pohl’s Gateway

 in 1992,Adventure — Marrsy

Frederik Pohl's Gateway Frederik Pohl's Gateway Frederik Pohl's Gateway

Story :

In the year 2077, the planet Venus was the new frontier for an overcrowded, exhausted, and nearly desperate Earth. Named for the roman goddess of love and beauty, this hostile world was no paradise. Colonists and explorers had to adapt to average temperatures of 900 degrees, a surface pressure of 94 atmospheres and a dense planetwide cloud cover made up of sulphuric acid. The real reason for mankind’s interest in Venus lay beneath the howling windstorms and acid clouds, under the planets jagged, parched and hellishly hot surface; a buried secret that held seemingly infinite promise.

Someone had come and gone before humans set foot on Venus. The planet was criss-crossed with tunnels carved out of the crust 500,000 years ago by a long vanished high technology society. The vanished aliens were a source of intense curiosity and hope for the twenty billion inhabitants of Earth. Wave after wave of explorers descended into the alien tunnels in search of advanced technology that might have been left behind by the so-called “Heechee”. Most of the artifacts discovered on Venus had no practical use and were little more than curiosities. The Heechee had cleaned out most of their useful technology – or so it seemed until a crotchety old tunnel explorer named Sylvester Macklin found a fully functional spacecraft in a sealed-off tunnel. Instead of reporting his find to the authorities, Macklin decided to try and figure out how to make the strange ship work. He climbed inside and began to fiddle with the controls.

Eventually Macklin found the right button. Rocket engines ignited and the ancient ship climbed out of the atmosphere of Venus on a plume of white fire. As soon as the ship was clear of the planet, the thrusters stopped and the ship disappeared into what is now known as Tau space.

When the ship returned to normal space, Macklin was delighted to find that he was still in Earth’s solar system. He was even more delighted to find himself docking with an immense Heechee artifact, a huge space station circling the sun between Venus and Mercury. Macklin’s ship parked itself inside a hangar filled with other ships of similar construction. Macklin left his ship to explore his sensational new find with a sense of awe and anticipation.

The bad news was that Macklin could not reset the guidance system of his ship and get it to go anywhere. He was stuck without food or water. He wrestled desperately with the controls as he became more hungry and thirsty. Towards the end Macklin knew that he wasn’t going home. He redirected his efforts toward a new goal…
Macklin decided that if he couldn’t go back, he could at least signal his discovery to humanity. His death would not be in vain. Macklin figured out how to detonate the fuel cells in his ship. The resulting flash was sighted by NASA and a mission was sent out to explore. The NASA mission arrived at the Heechee artifact and found hundreds of working faster-than-light Heechee starships, a priceless treasure that made the Heechee station mankind’s gateway to the stars. Thus the alien starship-parking garage earned its name: Gateway.

After a series of military confrontations and a narrowly averted war, the governments of the Major powers on Earth realized that Gateway was too valuable to be given you any one government. The governments agreed to establish a multinational corporation called Gateway Enterprises (often referred to as “The Corporation”) that would occupy Gateway and exploit the technology of the Heechee.

The FTL starships on Gateway are now used for a new form of high tech prospecting: human volunteers ride the alien ships in the hope that they will visit other worlds and bring back Heechee machines, tools and other potentially useful items. Because human scientists still don’t know how the ships guidance systems work, the destinations of these prospecting missions are unknown. For obvious reasons these missions carry an extraordinary degree of risk: 15% of prospector missions don’t come back and 80% return with little or nothing. The remaining 5% make the risks worthwhile, and can turn ordinary people into instant millionaires.

You won the local lottery on December 23. 2101. The prize was a one way ticket to gateway worth $238,575, including a limited partnership in Gateway Enterprises, transportation to gateway itself, a class in Heechee ship handling, and an invitation to go on the first available ship after graduation.

A week after you turned in your winning lottery ticket, you boarded an interplanetary ship travelling from Earth to Gateway.

It is now Wed, May 17, 2102, and you have been aboard Gateway for less than a day. You have been assigned living quarters and a proctor to show you around and get you settled in. Your first ship handling class starts later today.

You are about to become a gateway prospector.

Frederik Pohl's Gateway Frederik Pohl's Gateway Frederik Pohl's Gateway

There is something about Legend Entertainment adventures that I just really like. I first cut my teeth on the Spellcasting series (101,201,301) and had a whale of a time (although that was probably due to the *ahem* mature subject matter.)

Anyway, for those who have never seen a Legend adventure before I should probably start by saying that this is a text adventure (cue the sound of browsers being closed and Quake 3 being loaded up.) Yes a text adventure, you type in commands such as “Go west”, “Pick up gun” or “shoot reviewer in the face for making me read this crap”. IMHO this is the perfect medium for an adaptation of Pohl’s books, as it allows the story to be presented in such a way that you cannot help but be immersed.

The story? Well for those who didn’t take the time to read what I generously provided above (it only took me an hour to extract and type that, damnit) Gateway sees you cast in the role of a “Prospector”, one of the brave souls who pilots alien starships to unknown destinations in the hope of finding valuable artifacts to loot. A successful mission means fame and, more importantly, fortune, while an unsuccessful mission can mean anything form simple disappointment to agonizing death at the hands (hands?) of a huge alien insect. From this simple premise of exploring the unknown, the plot soon expands into a tale of a vastly powerful alien race hell-bent on the destruction of all sentient life (bit of a plot spoiler there.)

For the most part the puzzles in the game are excellent (especially the virtual reality ones), but I did find that on the whole they were a bit too easy. Which brings me to the game major failing, that fact that it only took me a few hours to complete it. Usually it takes a dumbass like me several days to get through a game like this (even with walkthrough in hand) so I can only conclude that the game’s difficulty level has been set WAY too low.

Apart from that it’s hard to find much wrong with the game; logical (easy) puzzles and a very good story add up to a very enjoyable game. AND the best thing of all is that the game is freeware, so you needn’t have any guilt about downloading it πŸ™‚

Related Links

Frederik Pohl’s Gateway

  • Designed by: Legend Entertainment
  • Published by: Legend Entertainment

Resources

9 January 2007

Hero Quest

 in 1991,Role Playing (RPG) — Marrsy

Hero Quest Hero Quest

Hero Quest (along with Space Crusade) was Games Workshop’s attempt to gain a foothold in the mainstream board games market. After an extensive advertising campaign the games and there add-ons gained a fair bit of popularity and it was inevitable that computerised version would be released.

And here we are πŸ™‚

Sooooooo horrible things have befallen the land. Plague, pestilence, fire, brimstone, gophers. In times like this who are you gonna call? A barbarian, a dwarf, an elf and a wizard that’s who dagnabbit! Our party must enter the terrible dungeons of Morcar and complete 15 quests, each more horrible and sticky than the last. Find treasure, kill green things and rescue people who are too retarded to rescue themselves.

Fun fun fun eh?

Each character can be controlled in turn by a different player. Each starts in a separate corner of the dungeon/board, after a random dice roll to determine the order of play its off we go and each little spod goes and does whatever thing that heroes do (rescuing maidens and headbutting orcs I should imagine).

Play goes like this – each character gets one movement and one action per turn. The amount of movement depends on the value that the player has rolled (with a dice.. go figure) and action is carried out before or after each movement. Actions are fighting, casting spells, disarming traps searching for treasure.. that type of thing. The dungeon consists of rooms and passages, with the contents of each room unknown to the player, who must search them using their actions.

Monsters – yep, the dungeon contains nasty things that want to hurt you. Goblins, Orcs, Skeletons, Chaos Warriors (my favourite) all intent on being mean to you =( Each player/monster has body points and mind points. The dwarf and barbarian are dumb but strong, while the elf and wizard are weedy but brainy. As a general rule of thumb high mind points means that you can do magic, and high body points means that you can hit things in the face… hard. The amount of points available to each player can be changed with various potions found in the dungeon… or obviously by walking face first into a trap.

At the end of each quest you get to spend all that lovely treasure that you found (you did find some right?) and buy swords, shields and spells to aid in your quest.

So yeah, you should know the score now πŸ™‚

If this sounds like your bag (yeah baby!) then download it you fool (FOOL!).

Related Links

Hero Quest

  • Designed by: Gremlin
  • Published by: Gremlin

Download Now »

Size: 583kb (2 min on 56k dial-up)

Resources

8 January 2007

The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy

Text Only

Coming a close second to Zork for the position of Infocom’s moast famous title, THHGTTG (hehe) is the adaption of Douglas Adam’s story of the same name. You play Arthur Dent, and your home (and planet) has been destroyed by a Vogon constructor fleet to make way for a hyper space by-pass. Rescued by your friend (who, unknown to you, is an alien) you will travel to alien worlds and into the past and future to discover the true nature of your, and mankinds, existance.

Most of the plot elements and great characters from the book have been transposed into the game, and it is this that is the game major shortcoming. Fans of the series will find little challenge in the game at all, everyone else will find some of the puzzles to be HIGHLY obscure and difficult.

This is a hard thing to disregard but if you can you will find THHGTTG to be a interesting game, utterly faithful to the original story.

Not one of my favourites, but I recommend it anyway.

Related Links

The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy

  • Published by: Infocom
  • Designed by: Infocom

Download Now »

Size: 128kb (1 mins on 56k dial-up)

Resources

The Hobbit

 in 1983,Adventure — Marrsy

The Hobbit The Hobbit

From The Tolkien Games Archive:

This is one of the most classic text adventures of all time; at least in Europe. The original game had a large vocabulary and very good character interaction for its time. It was probably the first time ever that such traits had been paired with graphics in any text adventure. In 1985 it was selected #1 in the magazine Sinclair User’s Top 50 Spectrum Software Classics (but it only made 42 in a later Top 100 List in Your Sinclair). The game was also released as part of The Tolkien Trilogy.

The game was first developed for the TRS-80, but when the ZX Spectrum was released, it was decided to continue development on that system, because of the Spectrum’s superior graphics and other capabilities. The first Spectrum version was called 1.1 to make it look more finished. A version 1.2 was later released with several bugs fixed.

A rumour that Tansoft created the Oric-1 versions is not true. Tansoft only distributed that version.

In the United States, it was published a few years after its original appearance as The Hobbit Software Adventure, a much extended and improved version. This version is the first part of The Tolkien Software Adventure Series. In Europe, this version was only distributed for the C64 and still under the title The Hobbit.

Across all platforms, the game sold in excess of one million copies.

The popularity of the game has inspired many parodies of it. So far, I know about The Boggit, An Everyday Tale of a Seeker of Gold, The Tebbit and Hobbit – The True Story. In addition, there is a German simplified BASIC version of the game called Der kleine Hobbit.

There are also references to The Hobbit in many other games. The Tunnel Like Hall picture is reproduced in Bored of the Rings, Gandalf and Bilbo appear in Werners Quest, there is a grave-stone with the text “R.I.P. The Hobbit” in the Commodore 64 version of The Quest for the Holy Grail and Quest for the Golden etc… has so many references that it is almost a complete parody of the game in itself.

The game was rewritten in PL/I for an MVS mainframe by an employee at IBM.

Personal Opinion: to be honest I found that the game moved a bit too fast for my liking, especialy at the beginning. THe game is based on a classic piece of literature and so I expected to be gently introduced to the plot, not thrust straight into things. The NPC’s too were slightly annoying, seemingly wandering around at random.

But what the hell, it’s a classic game and I love Tolkien, so I had to add it and you have to download it.

You know it makes sense πŸ™‚

Related Links

The Hobbit

  • Designed by: Beam Software
  • Published by: Melbourne House

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Size: 249kb (1 mins on 56k dial-up)

Resources

Hook

 in 1991,Adventure — Marrsy

Hook Hook

Movie tie-ins for the most part suck arsehole. They are little more than rushed, buggy attempts to cash in on a successful franchise. Hook is a movie tie-in, and while I wouldn’t go as far to say that the game is terrible, it is certainly not a true classic.

So why have I put it on the site you may ask, well

1) It was one of the few games that I bought for the Atari ST ( I got this and The Secret of Monkey Island at the same time, guess which game I prefer ;))
2) I worked damn hard to complete it, god knows why but I did. Now i’m going to push others to do the same.

If you’ve never seen the movie then you are going to be at a loss as to what is going on. You play Peter Banning who doesn’t know that he is (or was) Peter Pan. Your children have been kidnapped by the evil Captain Hook and it is up to you to journey to Nevernever land to rescue them.

My biggest probelm with Hook is that it could have been a damn good game, but it tries to follow the movie too closely. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing but Hook fails badly at it. I can’t help but feel if the game had either done more to follow the movie (there were some pretty emotional bits in it… not that I cried or anything.. nu uh!) or had gone in a completely different direction with the story it could have been a decent adventure. Instead, on completing the game I was left feeling.. well, nothing. I had no desire to play it again, no feeling of accomplishment, nothing at all.

OK, i’ve panned the game enough, is there anything good i can say about it? Well, some of the earlier puzzles are quite fun to solve (especialy one involving an anchor and some rope), the game looks very nice and at least Robin Williams doesn’t have body hair to rival a cro-magnon primate (if you haven’t seen the movie then accept that what I just said was funny and move on. who cares if it make no sense to you).

It’s a shame because part of me really wants to reccomend the game, but the serious adventure gamer part of me just wants to dump on it. I think that newbies to point ‘n’ click adventures or young kids might get a kick out of it, and maybe everyone else should try it just so they can form their own opinion.

Just keep your expectations low.

Related Links

Hook

  • Published by: OCEAN
  • Designed by: OCEAN

Download Now »

Size: 1501kb (6 min on 56k dial-up)

Resources

International Karate

 in 1989,Arcade — Marrsy

International Karate International Karate

This makes me want to cry.

Archer MaClean’s Interntional Karate (and it’s update, IK+) was without out a doubt the best and most fun game available on 8-bit systems. Argue with me on this and I will set fire to your house!

But THIS, this is a travesty. The graphics have gone straight to CGA hell, replaced by awful blue and magenta tones, the sound is quite frankly awful – it does retain the same fluid control system as it has on other platforms.. but the presentation spoils the whole game.

I suggest that you download this game, play it for five minutes and then go get an Atari ST or Amiga emulator and a copy of IK+ (or even a C64 or speccy emulator).

The difference between the two is extreme.

Such a let down =(

Related Links

International Karate

  • Published by: System 3
  • Designed by: System 3

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Size: 180kb (1 mins on 56k dial-up)

Resources

Interphase

 in 1991,First Person Shooter — Marrsy

Interphase Interphase

The following quote from Home of the Underdogs effectively sums up this game:

Interphase is an average action game from Mirrorsoft that disappointingly squanders the license of Neuromancer, classic cyberpunk novel it was based on.

Interphase is a first person shoot-em-up taking place in cyberspace (a visual simulation of the inside of a computer system). The problem is that it doesn’t know that it’s a FPS – it desperately wants to be a simulation or deep hacking game instead. But what it boils down to is that Interphase is a shoot-em-up just like Quake is a shoot-em-up. It has levels, obstacles and objectives just like any other FPS and it’s just a shame (for Interphase) that they probably forked out a hefty sum for the Neuromancer licence to produce this game.

Ok, enough of dumping on the game I think, lets be a bit more positive now because Interphase IS in fact, rather fun. As I said before the bulk of the game takes place in cyberspace with you being required to complete certain objectives – track down and destroy a bothersome piece of software or disable a security system for example. There are some quite interesting puzzles to solve in the game, thought they do get a little “samey”. The controls and interface can be a slightly awkward at times but it doesn’t affect the game too much.

All in all Interphase, while definately worth taking a look at, is nothing special. There are much better FPS’ and hacking games out there.

Related Links

Interphase

  • Designed by: Imageworks
  • Published by: Imageworks

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Size: 169kb (1 mins on 56k dial-up)

The Last Ninja 2: Back With a Vengeance

 in 1989,Action — Marrsy

The Last Ninja 2: Back With a Vengeance The Last Ninja 2: Back With a Vengeance

Having defeated his enemies in the first game, Mr Last Ninja rebuilds his ninja school… then something happens and he is transported to present day (well, 80’s) new york.. and theres a baddie and… oh I can’t be bothered.

If you’ve played the first game then this is more of the same, with slightly improved graphics and a more interesting setting.

That’s about all I can be bothered to say about it πŸ˜‰

Can you do better? Then bring it on!

Related Links

The Last Ninja 2: Back With a Vengeance

  • Published by: Activision
  • Designed by: Activision

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Size: 315kb (2 min on 56k dial-up)

Resources

The Last Ninja

 in 1988,Action — Marrsy

The Last Ninja The Last Ninja

Ninjas rock! You know it’s true!

The Last Ninja however sucks large amounts of buttock. Surely his elite martial arts training extended to “how not to die when coming within 3 feet of water” or “how not to miss a jump just because you were one micron off”.

Arsehead!

Anyway, your clan (ninja clan? who knows) has been brutaly murdered and it’s up to you to avenge them.. yadda yadda yadda. The game is an action/adventure hybrid that takes place from an isometric viewpoint across a faux-japanese landscape (the effect works well actualy). You must jump (waaaaay too much emphasis on this) fight and solve puzzles in order to reap bloody vengence on your enemies. Speaking of which, one area that Last Ninja does excel in is weaponry. Along with regular punching and kicking you can get access to a sword, nunchakas, a staff, smoke bombs, throwing stars.. and all those other thingies that make life groovy πŸ˜‰ HOWEVER, it’s a bit of a let down that the control system is so dire, meaning that actualy using your weapon is a lot harder than it has to be.
To be honest I remember the game being a lot more enjoyable on 8-bit systems (the C64 and ZX Spectrum).. maybe i’m just getting old πŸ˜‰ Nevertheless, once you get used to the controls and the pixel-perfect precision that the game requires you may enjoy it.

Related Links

The Last Ninja

  • Designed by: Activision
  • Published by: Activision

Download Now »

Size: 347kb (2 min on 56k dial-up)

Resources

The Lurking Horror

Text Only

Yeah! Horror stories – I love ’em. I was weened on Lovecraft, clothed by King, taken to school by Koontz… erm… pushed over in the playground by Rice… yeaaaah.
Anyway, back to my point – I love horror stories (and before you start, yes I wear lots of black, no I am not a Goth.. so eat me!)

The Lurking Horror was Infocom’s only attempt at a game with a horror setting. The game itself is not too hard (though it does have some very obscure puzzles) and IMO has a great plot. You are a student at GUE tech (a name that will be familiar to fans of Zork) and one night you have an irrestible urge to explore the universities basement. Well, the actual story is much more interesting and well thought out, but to learn more you will have to play the game and not rely on the description of someone who has the writing skills of a mental patient.

The pace of the game works very well and the puzzles and plot blend together perfectly, the many memorable characters and twists in the game also add to the experience.

I enjoyed The Lurking Horror, it might not appeal to everyone but for a desensitised horror fanatic like me it was great.

Two um.. clawed, bleeding thumbs up!

(god I suck!)

Related Links

The Lurking Horror

  • Published by: Infocom
  • Designed by: Infocom

Download Now »

Size: 718kb (3 min on 56k dial-up)

Resources

Mad TV

 in 1991,Simulation,Strategy — Marrsy

Mad TV Mad TV

A TV station management game, quite a novel idea that is well executed. Lots of humour (some of the animations will at least make you chuckle), good AI and a decent economics model (if that’s what yings your yang).

May be one to check out.

Related Links

Mad TV

  • Designed by: Rainbow Arts
  • Published by: Rainbow Arts

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Size: 781kb (3 min on 56k dial-up)

Metropolis

 in 1987,Adventure — Marrsy

Metropolis Metropolis

An obscure adventure game that was at the time of its release something of an innovation because it offers digitised speech through the PC speakers (although, it has to be said that the quality isn’t that great, it sounds like something akin to Welsh*).

In Metropolis you play a security agent assigned to investigate crimes in a futuristic city. Gameplay is parser driven (you type in commands) and most crimes are solved by asking question of the city’s inhabitants.

The graphics are functional and the less said about the PC speaker speech the better (damn that hurts my ears) but neither detracts from what is a highly original and charming game.

I like it, if you have any taste then you will too.

*Marrsy apologises to the nation of Wales and acknowledges that the Welsh language is a beautiful thing – if you like your face drenched in another persons phlegm that is.

Related Links

Metropolis

  • Designed by: Arcadia
  • Published by: Mastertronic

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Size: 139kb (1 mins on 56k dial-up)

Resources

Neuromancer

 in 1988,Adventure — Marrsy

First, the story:

Based on the William Gibson story of the same name, Neuromancer is set in a dark, dystopian future world where high technology is valued above human life. You play Case – a hacker* and mercenary who wants to do one last big job and get his life back on track, but why have so many of your fellow hackers been disapearing lately, and what’s going on in the “Matrix”.

If you’ve ever read the book then it WILL give you a head start in the game (if you havn’t then look at the links at the bottom of the screen.) Many characters and concepts are exactly the same, others have been left out completely. Plus the actual plot itself is more of an adaption of the book than a carbon copy, so there are still suprises in store for you.

*William Gibson was the first to coin the term, although in an earlier story.

Neuromancer Neuromancer Neuromancer

This is no standard adventure game. Yes, the same elements are there: travel from location to location acquiring the various clues and information needed to progress further, but once you get into the various “hacking* elements then you will understand why this is such a classic. A good example re the various skills that you can acquire in the game. These come in the form of computer chips that are inserted into a port in your head (no, really) and boost your abilities. The Cryptology skill chip will allow you to decode encrypted data and passwords, while “coptalk” gives you the ability to talk like a policeman – which does come in handy at one point. Each skillchip comes in different versions, so a v3.0 skill chip will be more useful than a v2.0, but obviously more expensive.

Then there is cyberspace (or the “Matrix” as it is called in the game.) At various locations there are terminals that allow you to read bulletin boards, or contact your bank and download some much-needed funds. Each of these terminals only has a limited range in cyberspace though, and you need to get your hands on a “deck” before you do anything really fun – and most likely illegal. For instance if your funds are running short then you can just hack your way into a corporations system and add your name to the employee list. Now you get a weekly paycheck for 10000 credits. However, there are obstacles that must be overcome in cyberspace. Besides having to decrypt passwords to enter systems you may encounter “ICE”, which stands for Intruder Countermeasure Electronics, these are tailor made artificial intelligence’s which act as guard dogs in the matrix. You can buy ICE breaker programs and computer viruses from dealerships in the game, but you must make sure that you have the right tools for the job or you could end up brain dead.

The game does have one big failing – the sub standard parser that is used to interrogate characters in the game. Unless you ask EXACTLY the right question then it is possible to be thrown completely off track, abandoning a line of questioning which would have been successful if you had just phrased things differently. Apart from that small thing the game is excellent, thoroughly engrossing and very enjoyable (just make sure you have a notepad ready while playing – you’ll need it.)

Related Links

Neuromancer

  • Designed by: Interplay, Cabana Boy
  • Published by: Interplay

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Size: 632kb (3 min on 56k dial-up)

The New Zealand Story

 in 1989,Platform — Marrsy

The New Zealand Story The New Zealand Story

I wish that i’d never added this bloody game, because now I have to endure bunny and her NZ cohorts whining about how “that looks nothing like a kiwi” and “the south island looks to big”.

Moan moan moan, that’s all I get.

Anyway, the reason that I DID add it is because New Zealand story is one of the only straight platform games that has managed to hold my attention for a decent length of time. I can’t put my finger on the reason why this is, it must be down to good design but anyway, there is something indescribably fun about the game and it definately has that “just one more go” factor.

Story is never a big thing in this type of game, but for those of you who are interested :

“New Zealand is a peaceful place to live – if you’re a kiwi, particularly in the Auckland zoo – Tiki is as happy as can be.
Trouble turns up in the guise of psychotic walrus who has an enormous appetite for fresh Kiwi and kidnaps Tiki and his relatives to stock the larder.
The walrus hides his captives around the island in 20 hazardous locations and our hero escapes and sets about rescuing his buddies. Watch the feathers fly as Tiki escapes his plan, for the walrus has some very strange companions and their out for blood.”

Graphicaly the game is not impressive at all – functional at best so this is not what draws me to the game. It’s the gampley that keeps me coming back. The game features nice simple level design, interesting enemies (especialy the big boss creatures) and some nice touches such as the ability to fly around the level on a baloon. There are also many weapon power-ups to suppliment the default bow and arrow, these range from bombs to invulnerability pills.

A simple, very very fun game that appeals to the big kid in me.

Recommended πŸ™‚

Related Links

The New Zealand Story

  • Designed by: Choice Software
  • Published by: OCEAN

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Size: 269kb (1 mins on 56k dial-up)

Resources

Operation Wolf

 in 1989,Arcade — Marrsy

Operation Wolf Operation Wolf Operation Wolf

The predecessor to other “shooter-on-rails” games such as Time Crisis, Virtua Cop and House of the Dead. If I recall correctly I can remember three games of this type being released on the ZX spectrum when I owned it – Opertaion Wolf Operation Thunderbolt and The Untouchables. Operation Thunderbolt was without a doubt the best, but this game is the classic.

The game is a first person shooter that scrolls slowly from left to right. Use the mouse (or if your a sadist, the keyboard) to move the target indicator around the screen, shooting enemy soldiers, tanks and helicopters (and the occasional turkey – play the game, you’ll see ;)). The game is best played with a lightgun.. but since that option isn’t available for the PC (hehe losers) you are stuck with the mouse.

Thr game is great fun, but after the third level or so it gets slightly repetitive. However, if you want a game that is easy to get into and involves lots of frantic shooting, this very well may be the one for you.

Operation Wolf Operation Wolf Operation Wolf

Related Links

Operation Wolf

  • Published by: Taito
  • Designed by: Taito

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Size: 608kb (3 min on 56k dial-up)

Resources

Pirates!

 in 1987,Strategy — Marrsy

Pirates! Pirates! Pirates!

There are a few games that come to mind when I think about the word “classic”. Civilisation, Elite, Monkey Island maybe.

Sid Meir’s Pirates! is a classic game in every sense of the word.

As the name suggests, the game casts you as a 18th century pirate in the Spanish Main and, I can’t emphasize this enough, the game is MASSIVE. As much as Elite was open-ended, so is Pirates! You are completely free to choose the path that your career takes. You can mercilessly plunder the seas, attack jewel trains, invade ports, dig for buried treasure. Or if you like you can align yourself with one of the four nations in the game and wage bloody war on their enemies (who their enemies actually are changes from time to time, so be careful). Get yourself a good enough reputation and you can gain rank, privilege and maybe even the hand of a governors daughter πŸ˜‰

Navigating the game-world is done via a top down map of the area, in which you sail you ship (or fleet if you are really successful) between ports, or go looking for other ships to attack.. or even search for buried treasure if you have a map. When another ship is encountered you get a choice of actions, you can attack them and attempt to steal their ship or cargo, or you can hail them for the latest news for example. Success in ship to ship combat is dependant on the size and speed of your vessel and the number of cannons that you have, and usually ends with you boarding the enemy ship and fighting the captain in a duel.

A remastered version of Pirates! was released in 1993 which had better graphics, sound and a few new features – none of which the game really needs. Given a choice between this and Pirates! Gold i’ll choose the original every time.

When it comes to atmosphere and addictiveness it’s hard to think of anything that comes close to this game. Highly recommended.

Related Links

Pirates!

  • Designed by: Sid Meier
  • Published by: Microprose

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Size: 738kb (3 min on 56k dial-up)

Resources

Populous

 in 1989,Simulation,Strategy — Marrsy

Populous Populous

Populous is an almost perfect mix of looks, charm and gameplay. It can be credited with starting a whole new genre (the ‘god’ game) and is indeed a true classic.

To put it another way, it fricken rocks!!!

In Populous you play a god, in fact you play a Good God. And of course if there’s a good God, it stands to reason that there’s gonna be a bad God kicking about the place somewhere. Anyway, you have followers, he has followers and you have to make sure that your guys come out on top. First of all you need a way to communicate your wishes to them, and throwing lightning bolts isn’t very concise so you need to appoint someone to speak for you, a high priest will fit the bill nicely. Right, now that you can talk to your followers you are gonna want them to do some of that “go forth and multiply” stuff.. but alas, the land is not flat enough to build upon.

But you’re a God, you can soon take care of that πŸ˜‰

So your people are settling across their newly flattened world, worshipping you and increasing your godly powers through ‘mana’ (more worshippers = more mana = more power). On the other side of the world Mr Bad God and his followers are doing the same thing, and sooner or later your two sides are going to meet and there’s gonna be trouble. So it’s upto you to get rid of him before he gets rid of you. Fortunately being a God means that you have some very nice weapons at your disposal: earthquakes, floods, volcanoes, you get the idea. You play the game across 500 worlds/levels starting at “genesis” and working through until you and your people have annihilated all opposition.

I haven’t really scratched the surface of the game yet, I havent talked about how you can transform your priest into a huge psycopathic knight who slaughters your enemies, or about the custom game mode. So I guess it’s up to you to download it and find out for yourself.

I promise you that you wont be disappointed. Populous is a wonderful game, good for a quick ten minute bash and long all night sessions.

Just do it πŸ™‚

Related Links

Populous

  • Designed by: Bullfrog
  • Published by: Electronic Arts

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Size: 185kb (1 mins on 56k dial-up)

Resources

Ragnarok

 in 1992,Role Playing (RPG) — Marrsy

Ragnarok

Ragnorak is a ASCII based dungeon exploration RPG in the style of the seminal Rogue (a game from the 80’s). You (the hero, either a warrior, blacksmith, woodsmith, rogue, sage, or a conjurer) must aid the good Norse gods in their battle against the evil Norse gods (Rangnarok is the Norse version of Armageddon).

Of all the “Rogue-like” RPGs, Ragnarok is probably one of the best (Morder: Depths of Dejenol also springs to mind). The sheer bulk of items and equiptment that is available to the player is amazing, add to this the fact that the game world is different every time you start the game and you have almost endless replayability.

Groovy eh?

Yes the graphics are very primitive, but this is more than made up for in depth and gameplay.

Related Links

Ragnarok

  • Published by: Norsehelm Productions

Rampage

 in 1988,Arcade — Marrsy

Rampage Rampage

You remember what it was like being a teenager right? hell I guess some of you ARE teenagers. Then you know what it feels like, your skin screws up, you get hair in really weird places, your voice wont make it’s mind up about what it wants to do and you just wish everyone would sod of and leave you alone or you just know you are gonna snap and do some SERIOUS damage to something.

Well anyway, when I was a teenager I had dreams, and my dreams were just like this game. I wanted to be 200ft tall and smash the hell out of everything, stamp on cars, pick up passers by and bite them in half…

Then this man came and gave me these pills and the bad thoughts went away, I only think about nice things like rainbows and fairies now.

Aaaaanyway, you’re here because you want to know about the game, not the dark thoughts that burrow into my mind like little worms screaming at me over and over and over again untill I JUST CAN’T TAKE IT ANYMORE!!!

um.. yeah, Rampage.
In Rampage you take on the roles of one of three huge monsters – an ape, a lizardman and a wolfman. The object of the game is to knock down all of the buildings on each level, but theres a catch. Not only are the other 2 monsters competing with you but the military has also been called in. So you will have tanks shooting at you from below and helicopters buzzing around your head. Luckily if take too much damage you can just reach inside someone’s apartment window and um.. get yourself a snack πŸ˜‰

Lose too much energy and you will revert to human (nekkid) form and have to sidestep off screen, covering your shame (be careful though, because you just know one of those other big sods will just pick you up and pop you into their mouth.

Rampage is a fun and addictive game, maybe lacking in depth but with a lot of replayability.

Download it, it’s good πŸ™‚

Related Links

Rampage

  • Designed by: Midway
  • Published by: Activision

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Size: 123kb (1 mins on 56k dial-up)

Resources

Rebelstar 2: Alien Encounter

 in 1989,Strategy — Marrsy

Rebelstar 2: Alien Encounter Rebelstar 2: Alien Encounter Rebelstar 2: Alien Encounter

A little history lesson before we get started. How many of you know who the Gollop brothers are?

….

Ooook um… hands up who here has played any of the first three X-Com games…

Cool, everyone who didn’t put their hand up should sod off and play X-Com (UFO: Enemy Unknown for you yanks) then come back so you know what i’m talking about. The rest of you can sit comfortably and listen because you are about to be educated.

Y’see, many many MANY years ago (nearly 20 in fact) a lad by the name of Julian Gollop created a simple strategy game for the ZX Spectrum and Amstrad CPC by the name of Rebelstar Raiders. It was a fun little turn based game which spawned a whole new genre – the arcade strategy game.

Then a few years later came the more sophisticated update entitled simply Rebelstar. This was a squad level turn based strategy game that involved breaking into a highly defended base and destroying it’s central computer (which was named ISAAC if you are at all interested). Play took place across several levels each with different objectives and obstacles and it was all pretty new and stunning for the time. After that came Rebelstar 2 (which we will talk about in just a minute) then Laser Squad. Laser Squad, released on 16-bit systems as well as 8-bit, used the same formula as Rebelstar but with many improvements such as joystick control and a greater variety of weapons (which could be equipped before each mission).

In 1991 Julian gollop (along with his brother Nick) showed a prototype of Laser Squad 2 to a representative of Microprose. The idea was to keep the same basic formula as the previous game but to update it with isometric graphics (similar to games like Populous). Microprose liked what they saw but wanted something “bigger” and this time set on Earth so that people could relate to it more. The brothers Gollop went away and came up with the idea of adding a grand strategic element to the game. With this X-Com was born, a game where you managed an international organisation that defended the Earth against UFO incursions. It had the same basic turn based combat model as Rebelstar but with updated graphics (and an isometric viewpoint), research and development and a financial model. The game was released in 1994 and remains a cult classic to this day (personaly it is one of my all time favourite games).

After X-Com came the sequel : Terror from the Deep. All the elements from the original remained in place, all that changed was that the setting was transposed from Air and Ground combat to undersea. It was this unoriginality which meant that, although it was by no means a bad game, it never gained the same status as the original.

In late 1997 the third game in the series, X-Com Apocalypse was released. The game improved on almost every aspect of the game, this time being set in a gigantic city under threat from inter-dimensional aliens. What truly set it apart from the first two games was that it gave you the chance to play in real time (the turn based system was still there of course). Along with this the game included advanced artificial inteligence, a realistic diplomacy and financial model (this played a big part in the game) as well as a living, breathing city to play in.

The games that followed were something of a let-down, probably due to the fact that the Gollop Brothers had little say in the direction that they took. X-Com interceptor was a disapointing mix of space combat and strategy, Email X-Com was as the name suggests a play by email strategy game. X-Com enforcer was a dire thrid-person shootemup and the less said about it the better. There WAS hope in the form of X-Com Alliance which was a first person squad based strategy game and an unamed remake of the first X-Com using modern technology. Unfortunately as yet neither have seen the light of day.

The only recent addition to the series has been Laser Squad : Nemesis, Thankfully developed by Codos (ie, the Gollops and Steven Moorhouse, who worked on Apocalypse) it is a massive single/multiplayer game with three distinct races and huge emphasis on strategy. It is allready getting rave reviews so thankfully it looks liek there is still a little life in the series :).

So to recap :

Rebelstar Raiders > Rebelstar > Rebelstar 2 > Laser Squad > X-com Series

There now, don’t we feel educated?

I’m now going to totally throw you off track by going back nearly 15 years and talking about Rebelstar 2 – don’t yer just love it? πŸ˜›

Rebelstar 2 held much more appeal for me than the first game, probably because the idea of fighting wave upon wave of gieger-esque aliens appeals to me more than destroying tin-can robots. The game centers around the increasing threat of an alien race on a distant planet, and your squad of space marines have been sent to deal with them. The game is simplicity itself right from the start, equip each of your agents with a weapon (anything from a lightsaber to huge photon guns) and use your remaining TUs (point which dictate what each unit can do each turn) to either move across the map or attack your enemies. The aliens themselves are diverse and interesting – from hulking warriors to tentacled water dwellers, the map are well designed and quite large considering when the game ws released (I particularly like cutting through those alien vines on the first level :)).

For those who have played later Gollop games it will all be very familiar and no doubt highly enjoyable. I have also included the 2 player version of the game, meaning if you want you and a friend can take eachother on – you can even do it by email if you save the snapshot after eachothers turn and send it back and forth.

Simply a superb game that was way ahead of its time. Bags of gameplay and enjoyment to be had from it (pulling off a driect hit from one side of the map to the other with the photon just feels great =)) and the game is very replayable.

I highly recommend this one, two thumbs up n stuff!

Related Links

Rebelstar 2: Alien Encounter

  • Designed by: Target Games
  • Published by: Silverbird Software

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Size: 256kb (1 mins on 56k dial-up)

Resources

Renegade

 in 1988,Arcade — Marrsy

Renegade Renegade

OK, back to my childhood for this one peeps. The first computer that I ever owned was a Sinclair ZX Spectrum +3…

Actualy scratch that, the Spectrum (or ‘Speccy’) was more akin to a shoebox than a computer. A shoebox that crassed repeatedly. A shoebox that crashed repeatedly and NOISELY! (WEEEEEEEOWWWW BWEEEEEEEEP!!! etc)

Right, back to my story. I got my lil speccy for Christmas all those years ago along with a boxed set of fighting games (yeah!). There was International Karate, Barbarian (both will be on this site soon) and Renegade among others. Many hours of my childhood were wasted kicking bikers in the head and throwing them off subway platforms into the darkness below.. so when I found out that there was PC version of this game I just had to have a copy.

And y’know what? It was better on the speccy.

Renegade is a fighting game in case you haven’t guessed, if you’ve ever played Double Dragon or Bad Dudes you’ll know what is involved. Fight an ever increasing number of baddies across several levels, getting ever closer to the BIG BOSS!

Yeah.. not much more to it than that, no one said a game had to be deep to be fun after all πŸ™‚ Graphics-wise the game is quite nice, if a little blocky and unclear and I cant really complain about the sound.. but the game just doesn’t feel as cohesive as it did on the speccy. It’s often hard to judge kicks and punches because the overly-colourful sprites mean that everything can be a jumble at times. The moves are also a bit limited.. you cant walk and punch at the same time for example.

On the PC this is an average game, on the speccy it kicked ass. I would suggest you download it and form your own opinion.

Related Links

Renegade

  • Designed by: Taito
  • Published by: Taito

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Size: 424kb (2 min on 56k dial-up)

Resources

Rogue: The Adventure Game

 in 1983,Role Playing (RPG) — Marrsy

Rogue: The Adventure Game Rogue: The Adventure Game

From the Roguelike Games FAQ file:

A long time ago, on a computer system far, far, away, there was Rogue. Players wandered a dungeon, hacking and slashing at monsters, gaining treasures, becoming more powerful, and living their D&D nightmares.

Rogue was a good game; people still play it. It was even distributed with many copies of Unix. But rogue is a relatively simple and limited game compared to most of the descendants it has spawned…

Although the common features of rogue and its many descendants are “obvious” to many people, they are difficult to describe in simple terms. Generally, the games mentioned below are single-user, fantasy role-playing computer games, generally set in a dungeon, run with a simple character-graphic interface. In all of the games, the player controls a single character, who roams around getting more powerful, in order to fulfill a difficult quest. Sword-and-sorcery rule the day. Logistically, they’re all free games; executables, and generally sources, are available by FTP.

For more info visit The Roguelike Games Homepage and A Brief History of Rogue.

Rogue is a very simple ASCII based dungeon exploration game that sparked off a whole generation of imitations: Angband, Nethack, Ragnarok and ADOM to name a few. It’s charm lies in its very simple control system, graphics (B=a bat, S=a snake etc) and almost endless replayability.

There isn’t a whole lot else to say about it, just download it yourself and see.

Related Links

Rogue: The Adventure Game

  • Designed by: Artificial Intelligence Design
  • Published by: Artificial Intelligence Design, Epyx

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Size: 63kb (1 mins on 56k dial-up)

7 January 2007

Space Quest 3: The Pirates of Pestulon

 in 1988,Adventure,Space Quest — Marrsy

Space Quest 3 Space Quest 3 Space Quest 3

I guess before I get started I should say i’m prejudiced against Sierra adventures, in fact I have a natural dislike of any point and click adventure games in which it is possible to die (gimme Lucasarts all the way baybee!)

With that said, Space Quest 3 isn’t too bad at all.

The game carries on from SQ 2. Having escaped in a cryo pod from Vohaul’s asteroid he is picked up by an automatic garbage ship.. and so our next adventure begins.

SQ 3 was the first in the series to use Sierra’s AGI system, which among other things added mouse control to the game. It makes playing quite a bit easier now that you dont have to rely solely on cursor keys and the parser (which is still present BTW).

This is the first Space Quest game that I enjoyed playing, and although it retains many of the previous games flaws (such as an annoying habit of killing you with little or no warning) it improves on them in many areas.

Related Links

Space Quest 3: The Pirates of Pestulon

  • Published by: Sierra
  • Designed by: Sierra

Resources

Space Quest 5: The Next Mutation

 in 1993,Adventure,Space Quest — Marrsy

Space Quest 5 Space Quest 5 Space Quest 5

After his adventures through time in SQ4, Roger Wilco is back as a cadet in StarFleet Academy (Star Trek spoof alert eh?).

This is by far my favourite game in the series, the graphics are great, the humour is not too subtle, but not too in your face (for the most part anyway) and I loved piloting the star ship – a great idea IMO.

I do have a few gripes though, the humour can be a little groan inducing at times (Captain Quirk… riiiight) and some of the arcade sequences are tiresome.

A great adventure game IMO, but suffering from the same flaws that I associate with most Sierra adventure games.

Get it.

Space Quest 5 Space Quest 5 Space Quest 5

Related Links

Space Quest 5: The Next Mutation

  • Designed by: Sierra
  • Published by: Sierra

Resources

Star Wars

 in 1986,Arcade — Marrsy

Star Wars Star Wars

You wanna know what makes Star Wars so popular? It’s that every god-danged person on this PLANET wants a light sabre. Don’t deny it because you know it’s true!

This game has no lightsabres (Jedi knight does though, so go buy that), instead it’s scope is limited to the assualt on the Death Star which took place at the end of A New Hope. Firstly you must take on a wave of Tie Fighters (how many ships depends on the difficulty level you have it on) and then fly down the Death Star trench to take out the exhaust port and win the day for the rebellion.

Repeat this over and over and over again.

Visually the game is nothing flash by todays standards (did you expect anything else?) consisting of 16 colour vector graphics. The game is fun to play for a while but gets boring quite fast. the main reason that I added it here is that I have fond memories of playing this game in the arcades, sitting in the cockpit blasting tie fighters and hearing the immortal “use the force luke!” (you wont hear this in the PC version so don’t get your hopes up).

Fun as hell the first few times you play it – providing you get it running at the correct speed. After that, somewhat dull.

But hell, i’m allowed to be nostalgic πŸ™‚

Related Links

Star Wars

  • Designed by: Vektor grafix
  • Published by: BrΓΈderbund

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Size: 44kb (1 mins on 56k dial-up)

Starflight 2: Trade Routes of the Cloud Nebula

 in 1989,Role Playing (RPG) — Marrsy

Starflight 2 Starflight 2 Starflight 2

A new section of the galaxy to explore, new aliens to meet, and the chance to kick a few blobby Spemin butts – if you like Starflight 1 your gonna love this game (if you didn’t like Starflight 1 then I demand you get off my site now.)

So is Starflight 1 better than Starflight 2? The answer is Yes and No

Yes in that its a bigger game that has better graphics and sound. And of course that it gives the people who like the first game another Starflight fix. Also the plot is just as imaginative as the first game, maybe even more so.

No in that the game doesn’t seem to have the same “magic” as the first one did. Maybe it’s just the fact that the game isn’t a new experience any more, at least to me (the first time I played Starflight 1 it just blew me away.)

That aside tho, there is still plenty of new things to discover, including many new and varied alien races – the terminally depressed Dweenie being my favourite – I just find them hilarious for some reason. Also the idea to change the Spemin from cowardly little “whipping-blobs” into a massively powerfull race is a masterstroke, as are the “time travel” parts of the game – but I dont want to give away too much, like I said before the beauty of Starflight is discovering things for yourself.

Starflight 2 Starflight 2 Starflight 2

Important Info:

Type in the code 34789 to bypass the copy protection.

You may have problems running this game on a newer computer system because the game relies so heavily on clock speeds. I have tried to compile as much info. on getting the Starflight games working (document is available above), but if that doesn’t help you then try the Interstel Comm Centre (link at the bottom of the screen) a great Starflight forum.

Related Links

Starflight 2: Trade Routes of the Cloud Nebula

  • Designed by: Binary Systems
  • Published by: Electronic Arts

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Size: 437kb (2 min on 56k dial-up)

Resources